Book Review

All We Can Save

By: Ayana Elizabeth Johnson | Category: Unkown category | Year: 2020 ISBN: 9780593237076

Provocative and illuminating essays from women at the forefront of the climate movement who are harnessing truth, courage, and solutions to lead humanity forward. There is a renaissance blooming in the climate movement: leadership that is more characteristically feminine and more faithfully feminist, rooted in compassion, connection, creativity, and collaboration. While it’s clear that women and girls are vital voices and agents of change for this planet, they are too often missing from the proverbial table. More than a problem of bias, it’s a dynamic that sets us up for failure. To change everything, we need everyone. All We Can Save illuminates the expertise and insights of dozens of diverse women leading on climate in the United States—scientists, journalists, farmers, lawyers, teachers, activists, innovators, wonks, and designers, across generations, geographies, and race—and aims to advance a more representative, nuanced, and solution-oriented public conversation on the climate crisis. These women offer a spectrum of ideas and insights for how we can rapidly, radically reshape society. Intermixing essays with poetry and art, this book is both a balm and a guide for knowing and holding what has been done to the world, while bolstering our resolve never to give up on one another or our collective future. We must summon truth, courage, and solutions to turn away from the brink and toward life-giving possibility. Curated by two climate leaders, the book is a collection and celebration of visionaries who are leading us on a path toward all we can save. With essays and poems by: Emily Atkin • Xiye Bastida • Ellen Bass • Colette Pichon Battle • Jainey K. Bavishi • Janine Benyus • adrienne maree brown • Régine Clément • Abigail Dillen • Camille T. Dungy • Rhiana Gunn-Wright • Joy Harjo • Katharine Hayhoe • Mary Annaïse Heglar • Jane Hirshfield • Mary Anne Hitt • Ailish Hopper • Tara Houska, Zhaabowekwe • Emily N. Johnston • Joan Naviyuk Kane • Naomi Klein • Kate Knuth • Ada Limón • Louise Maher-Johnson • Kate Marvel • Gina McCarthy • Anne Haven McDonnell • Sarah Miller • Sherri Mitchell, Weh’na Ha’mu Kwasset • Susanne C. Moser • Lynna Odel • Sharon Olds • Mary Oliver • Kate Orff • Jacqui Patterson • Leah Penniman • Catherine Pierce • Marge Piercy • Kendra Pierre-Louis • Varshini • Prakash • Janisse Ray • Christine E. Nieves Rodriguez • Favianna Rodriguez • Cameron Russell • Ash Sanders • Judith D. Schwartz • Patricia Smith • Emily Stengel • Sarah Stillman • Leah Cardamore Stokes • Amanda Sturgeon • Maggie Thomas • Heather McTeer Toney • Alexandria Villaseñor • Alice Walker • Amy Westervelt • Jane Zelikova

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Gladwyn d'Souza
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October 23, 2020 11:04 am
Questions to consider for chapter titled Begin: 1. Do you think of yourself as a climate feminist? If so, what does that identity mean to you? If not, how does it feel to try it on? 2. What are the qualities of feminine/feminist climate leadership, and where do you see it emerging? 3. If “what ...
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we pay attention to grows,” what do you want to pay attention to and grow together over the course of this book? 4. Adrienne Rich opens the book with a poem on finding common cause with those who reconstitute the world. Who are they in the climate context? 5. The remainder of the book is framed in a poem that lays out the terrain but takes inspiration from Virginia Woolf that though the future is dark that's the best we can say about it. What are your thoughts on this
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Gladwyn d'Souza October 23, 2020 11:19 am
Answers: 1. A climate feminist is, in the context of Eunice Newton Foote, someone who isn’t professionally siloed; and instead gets involved in social issues of the day. Foote was involved with suff...
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rage that impacted women which is where the word feminist gets applied to climate. A climate feminist today would need to address the many inequities of care from Medicare For All to ChildCare and our Senior Tsunami all of which contribute to the climate crisis. Everyone should try Climate Feminism especially in the context of a “black single mother of two climate feminist.” 2. The characteristics of climate feminism are compassion connection creativity and collaboration. It emerges where all voices are heard. However my one criticism of this section is that every generation has to redefine it’s precepts because the status quo coops them. 3. We can’t manage what we don’t see or evaluate or measure. We need to pay attention to fast fair and frugal (3F) solutions. Green streets for example pass the 3F test and have co-benefits such as reduced emissions and particularly pollutants that exacerbate infection during a pandemic. 4. There are more reconstituting the world than destroying it. 50% of the world lives on less than a $1 per day. These subsistence farmers cannot afford fossil fuels. People who walk and bike and wear a hat and warm coat in the winter also reconstitute the world. Seniors who walk from tiny apartments in dense cities like San Francisco produce few per capita emissions. Less that a 100 companies are responsible for 90% of emissions. 5. The Woolf quote is inspiring. No one especially the talking heads know what the future holds. We need to do all and ask for all that can meaningly change the future.
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Mary Buxton
rated it
October 20, 2020 12:47 pm
Hi Shelly! I am now starting this book. Mary b
Gladwyn d'Souza
rated it
October 13, 2020 11:37 am
The subtitle says it all- Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis! This book by women opens with a quote from Adrienne Rich that instead of despair we make common cause with those who persevere with restoration. Chapter 1 starts out by introducing us to Eunice Newton Foote. She is t...
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he first scientist to warn about Climate Change in 1856. Irish Physicist John Tyndall also has an essay in the same magazine. Three years later he publishes a similar essay on heat trapping gas which is considered the beginning of climate science. Foote was a suffragist who signed the 1854 Declaration at Seneca Falls along with Frederick Douglas. If Foote was a climate feminist it's revealing that Tyndall opposed suffrage. That same patriarchal power to elevate winners is at the heart of the degradation that we encounter in the natural world leading to climate change. Yet the same tone deaf policy continues despite the increasing revelation of gender based violence, extraction and ruthless corruption. The climate crisis retards the rights of everything else. Thus this chapter calls for gender responsive strategies to developing resilience and adaptation. Arrayed against climate destruction is compassion, connection, creativity, and collaboration that defines the new feminist renaissance from Greta Thunberg to Rigoberta Menchu. They are sidelined or violently opposed with no seat at the decision making centers; and marginalized especially in exploited extractive areas. The destructive degraders of our common future rule without acknowledging or redressing those who invest their lives into caring for our planet. Humanity, ecosystems and species cannot survive the status quo. We must work together for change. This book presents more representative voices on how to achieve climate solutions across a range of sectors
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Sue C.
rated it
October 11, 2020 5:32 am
Welcome to our book group, Shelly!
Shelly Gordon
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October 11, 2020 5:31 am
Hi everyone! I'm Shelly Gordon, a friend of Sue Chow's. We served on the executive committee of the Sierra Club/Loma Prieta chapter 3 yrs ago. Sue is still faithfully serving on the committee. I moved to Arizona and am happy we reconnected. I look forward to participating in the gro...
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up!
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Sue C. October 22, 2020 1:26 am
Shelly--feel free to post your thoughts as you are reading. Ask questions, comment on anything, criticize, add info, apply info to your own experience, compare the author's insights to yours, et...
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c. This is an open-ended forum, so don't hold back!
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